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Accessible, Perfect Wisdom

8 Dec

No mere man had greater wisdom than Solomon (1 Kings 4:29–32). Yet, regarding his wisdom, he received it (1 Kings 4:29), and therefore it is less than its source—indeed so much less (Job 12:13; Rom. 11:33)! Christians can be confident that we trust and serve a perfectly wise God. We can find contentment in him, knowing that he is wisely bringing about his perfect plan (Isa. 46:10). We can have hope and peace in the worst of circumstances, knowing that God’s wise providence is caring for us (Phil. 4:7; Psa. 23). We can rejoice knowing that we do not trust and serve a lesser king, but the omniscient, omni-wise King of kings. We can worship him for his lovely wisdom, especially for the wisdom shown in his eternal plan of redemption through the blood sacrifice of Jesus Christ (1 Pet. 1:20; Acts 2:23). And we can shout “hallelujah” for the giving of his perfect wisdom to us in his Word (2 Tim. 3:16; Prov. 1–2)! What a tremendous gift. If one lacks wisdom, ask the Lord who gives generously (James 1:5)! Seek it in the pages of Holy Scripture, asking that the Spirit would illumine your mind and heart to receive, know, and apply the wisdom already laid down—the wisdom that can make man complete (2 Tim 3:15–17).

Let us not think, Oh, I wish I could have sat at the feet of Solomon. Oh, to be one of the men that stood in his presence. Remember, you can sit at the feet of the Almighty; you can stand in his presence by opening your Bible and praying for the Spirit’s assistance. And if “Happy are [the] men, happy are [the] servants, that stand continually before [Solomon], and that hear [his] wisdom” (1 Kings 10:8), how much happier ought we to be who have the complete, perfect wisdom of God recorded for us and accessible to us in his Scripture!

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15 Dangers of Self-Pity

18 Dec

Self-pity puts the self first.
Self-pity can lead to cynicism.
Self-pity can lead to inactivity.
Self-pity can lead to negativism.
Self-pity can lead to depression.
Self-pity is contrary to the Gospel.
Self-pity is an enemy of contentment.
Self-pity often forgets the plight of others.
Self-pity forgets that suffering is part of life.
Self-pity can cause you to be critical of others.
Self-pity takes the mind off of God’s promises.
Self-pity often forgets the benefits of suffering.
Self-pity is adverse to determination and perseverance.
Self-pity takes the eyes off of the many blessings given you.
Self-pity is self-perpetuating and will increase in its destructive power.

Self-pity is a gnawing evil. Instead of pitying the self, pity Christ.

“Have this mind in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: who…emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men; and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, becoming obedient even unto death, yea, the death of the cross.” -Philippians 2:5-8

Pray for Those

24 Jul

“You shall not revile God, nor curse a ruler of your people” (Ex. 22.28). I hear an awful lot of cursing of our rulers. We may not always agree with them, and they may not always do what is in our best interest, or even have it in mind at all times. Yet, this hatred and bitterness is unbecoming of Christians. Instead we ought to be following God’s mandate:”First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way” (1 Tim. 2.1-2). And even when you believe your leaders to be your enemies who persecute you, we ought to do as King David did, as Paul did, and Jesus our Lord instructed to do: “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’  But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,  so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust” (Matt. 5:43-45). Let us be a prayerful people. A people devoted to God and his ways.

Be Not Surprised

12 Jul

Christian, let us not be surprised at the hardness of worldly hearts. How can we expect those yet “enslaved to various lusts and pleasures,” like we once were, to desire the will of God (Titus 3)? We still struggle against sin having had our hearts softened and our eyes opened. Let us, therefore, certainly promote and stand for the things of God, not denying the good truth found in the Word,  yet be men and women of grace, patience, love, compassion, and faith,  hoping too that the joyous message of salvation may soften even the hardest, coldest, deadest of hearts.